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Thread: Keep my stock ECM as backup?

  1. #1
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    Keep my stock ECM as backup?

    I bought a MPVI2 tuner and I have been familiarizing myself with the software with files from the tune repository. I?m afraid to jump in on mine unless I have a spare ECM to fall back on as this is my daily driver. My plan is to buy a spare ECM of the same year and service tag # and write my stock tune to it and use it for tuning. If anything goes wrong put the stock ECM back in I assume I can backup my stock tune without credits and then I would need credits to write to the spare ecm.

    Is there anything I might be missing or is my logic flawed in any way? Do I have to relearn the keys or anything else when going from one to the other? Also, is the mileage transferred with the ECM? Does the vin transfer with the tune file? Any advice keeping me from making a costly mistake would be greatly appreciated. I hope to become a contributing member to this forum in the future.

    2012 Chevy Silverado 1500 4x4 4.8L 4L60E 3.42

  2. #2
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    Bill@HPTuners's Avatar
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    flashing the file from your ecm to a different ecm is not advised and we would recommend against doing so. It typically causes more issues than it fixes costing you additional time, expense & credits. You do so at your own risk.
    It doesn't have to be perfect, it just needs to be done in two weeks...

    A wise man once said "google it"

  3. #3
    Tuning Addict 5FDP's Avatar
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    If you are going to go with another computer, have someone with a dealership level tool flash the computer with your VIN number and calibration. This was the PCM/TCM are a complete match.

    Then you can license that computer with HP Tuners and have your factory computer as a back up. This will prevent you from spending many credits and possibly bricking the computer if you did something wrong when flashing a new file into it.
    2016 Silverado CCSB 5.3/6L80e, not as slow but still heavy.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bill@HPTuners View Post
    flashing the file from your ecm to a different ecm is not advised and we would recommend against doing so. It typically causes more issues than it fixes costing you additional time, expense & credits. You do so at your own risk.
    Quote Originally Posted by 5FDP View Post
    If you are going to go with another computer, have someone with a dealership level tool flash the computer with your VIN number and calibration. This was the PCM/TCM are a complete match.

    Then you can license that computer with HP Tuners and have your factory computer as a back up. This will prevent you from spending many credits and possibly bricking the computer if you did something wrong when flashing a new file into it.
    I'm glad I asked and I will definitely play it safe. I would like to learn more about the levels of programming. I assumed if I had the same service tag # it would have the same slave os and I would just need to update the tune and the vin. I was even going to find one of the same year and drivetrain. I love technical stuff so this is fascinating to me.

  5. #5
    Tuning Addict 5FDP's Avatar
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    Yeah if you got a very similar computer, like a 2011-2013 it would be pretty much a match. Then whoever programs the computer would be able to see the exact calibration your VIN came with and would flash it so it would match up and keep the TCM happy.
    2016 Silverado CCSB 5.3/6L80e, not as slow but still heavy.

  6. #6
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    The Service Number only refers to the hardware inside, the software loaded into it is completely separate. The Part Number, and the 4-letter calibration code (YMUM, YNBF, etc), describe the base OS & calibration.

    If you have a way to get it programmed with GM tools you can totally ignore the Part Number/calibration. As long as you have the correct Service Number you're good to go, no matter what platform the ECM was used in.