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Thread: Toyota Repository

  1. #81
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    There are a few different ways to get your calibration file for your ECU and this goes beyond the scope of what you can do with hpt.

    One way is to read the calibration directly from the ECU. This requires some specialized equipment that is readily available and relatively affordable. But if you're after only one file you do not want to go this route.

    Two is you get the CUW (Calibration Update Wizard) file from the Toyota TIS. This would cost you $20 for a 48-hour subscription to TIS. Then there is a free online conversion tool that will translate the CUW file to a binary/hexdump. From there I don't know how you translate it to hpt.

    The third way is to purchase the binary/hexdump from BitBox. They have a catalog of every Toyota ECU. Their cost per file is not too unreasonable.

    I don't know how a .cuw or .bin correlates with a .hpt. All three file types contain the exact same information, but in different formats. I have not attempted to decode the .hpt format. The .cuw is an obfuscated/lightly encrypted format that Toyota uses to protect its intellectual property, but it has been cracked. The .bin is a standard format that most tuning professionals use and it is the format actually stored in the ECU's memory and it can be flashed directly to the ECU with standard tools.

  2. #82
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    Thanks for that info very interesting!

  3. #83
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    Quote Originally Posted by Merryfrankster View Post
    There are a few different ways to get your calibration file for your ECU and this goes beyond the scope of what you can do with hpt.

    One way is to read the calibration directly from the ECU. This requires some specialized equipment that is readily available and relatively affordable. But if you're after only one file you do not want to go this route.

    Two is you get the CUW (Calibration Update Wizard) file from the Toyota TIS. This would cost you $20 for a 48-hour subscription to TIS. Then there is a free online conversion tool that will translate the CUW file to a binary/hexdump. From there I don't know how you translate it to hpt.

    The third way is to purchase the binary/hexdump from BitBox. They have a catalog of every Toyota ECU. Their cost per file is not too unreasonable.

    I don't know how a .cuw or .bin correlates with a .hpt. All three file types contain the exact same information, but in different formats. I have not attempted to decode the .hpt format. The .cuw is an obfuscated/lightly encrypted format that Toyota uses to protect its intellectual property, but it has been cracked. The .bin is a standard format that most tuning professionals use and it is the format actually stored in the ECU's memory and it can be flashed directly to the ECU with standard tools.

    ok bear with me as im still not 100% sure what i am doing. but what is the difference doing what you are talking about here and me opening HPT reading my truck and making adjustments there then re-writting to the truck?

  4. #84
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    Quote Originally Posted by nitrobrain06 View Post
    ok bear with me as im still not 100% sure what i am doing. but what is the difference doing what you are talking about here and me opening HPT reading my truck and making adjustments there then re-writting to the truck?
    HPT doesn't allow you read the actual tune file that is written onto your ECU, rather it reads your ECU ID and gives you the original calibration to start from. This can be an issue if you've already had tuning done that you are mostly happy with but want to make small changes to. Otherwise, starting from scratch shouldn't be much of a problem since most of us aren't running any seriously drastic engine mods that would make the stock file a difficult starting point.

    Also, I'd like to share that I'm testing out a bit of a spark table reworking that seems to be going well. I removed the 25% and 35% rows from the Engine Load axis in the High Octane Spark table and inserted 45% and 55% rows which gives me better resolution in that medium load zone that also tends to be the most common area to see Knock sensor activity, especially at 2000RPM and below. The original table has big jumps in those rows and I've found my truck spending a lot of time in between them so being able to more finely tune those areas is looking to be very beneficial.

  5. #85
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    Quote Originally Posted by nitrobrain06 View Post
    ok bear with me as im still not 100% sure what i am doing. but what is the difference doing what you are talking about here and me opening HPT reading my truck and making adjustments there then re-writting to the truck?
    Like the other nice gentleman has implied, HPT does not give you a direct view of the actual file, it gives you a structured view through its user interface. This is what an actual file looks like:

    Bin-neo-2.png

    This is a raw view in hex format of the ECU's firmware - it is like the BIOS of your PC.

    HPT knows the structure of the file and it takes the relevant numbers and puts them in its user interface so you can edit and save the numbers without having to figure out where they are located in the file. This is what you pay for when you buy a license, otherwise you spend hundreds of hours going through the file yourself and figuring out the details.

  6. #86
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    Just checked today CVN is not original
    any possibility to correct it?

  7. #87
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    Has anybody figured out how to disable flex fuel . My 2017 keeps reading higher ethanol percentages and I?ve only ever ran 10% ethanol at the highest. Also is there a way to perform the alcohol content reset with HPTuners. Thanks

  8. #88
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lathan601 View Post
    Has anybody figured out how to disable flex fuel . My 2017 keeps reading higher ethanol percentages and I?ve only ever ran 10% ethanol at the highest. Also is there a way to perform the alcohol content reset with HPTuners. Thanks
    Lathan,

    I just figured out with my FFV Tundra that it calculates the ethanol content by looking at fuel trims after a fuel up.

    If you have a lower maf table (where you regularly have positive fuel trims) then the ECM thinks you are lean because of ethanol fuel and calculates based on HOW positive your trims are.

    I purposefully lowered my idle MAF table by 30% and watched my FT after fill up go from +30s and "0 % ethanol" to mostly even FT and 81% ethanol (this was on 93, with NO ethanol other than whats in all regular fuel).

    You cannot reset the ethanol content with HPT, but if you go in and raise your idle and cruise cells of the maf table 10-15%, then fill up with 5 to 10 gal, and drive for a little bit... you should see your ethanol content go lower.

    I would just do this until the content says "0" and then dial your maf table to be just a few % on the high side (-1 to -3 STFT/LTFT). This should keep your ECM from thinking you are running eth.

  9. #89
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    Does anyone running 650 Deatschwerks injectors have info on what to enter for the "Injector Constant" and "Injector Constant Inv" tables?

    I saw where they give the Battery Offset data and have that info for the Voltage Offset chart (8-16v)... But unsure on the 2 main numbers for "Constant".

    If I go off an estimate of what the TRD injectors are, "480" (page 2)... = 0.098381 Constant.... then the 650's would be 0.0726509 (650/480 = 35% increase... 0.098381/1.35= 0.07265)

    For the inverse, if I compare the 0.0726509 to my stock FFV data (0.11019 Constant, a 51.5% difference)... the stock inverse is "2.10962".. so if I multiply by the same percentage(51.5%), I am guessing that the inverse for the 650s is 3.22378?

    Does that sound right?

    0.0726509 Constant
    3.22378 Inverse Constant

    Curious on both checking my math and if anyone is actually running these and what numbers you are using and how they are working. Thanks!

  10. #90
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    Quote Originally Posted by 4firemandan View Post
    Lathan,

    I just figured out with my FFV Tundra that it calculates the ethanol content by looking at fuel trims after a fuel up.

    If you have a lower maf table (where you regularly have positive fuel trims) then the ECM thinks you are lean because of ethanol fuel and calculates based on HOW positive your trims are.

    I purposefully lowered my idle MAF table by 30% and watched my FT after fill up go from +30s and "0 % ethanol" to mostly even FT and 81% ethanol (this was on 93, with NO ethanol other than whats in all regular fuel).

    You cannot reset the ethanol content with HPT, but if you go in and raise your idle and cruise cells of the maf table 10-15%, then fill up with 5 to 10 gal, and drive for a little bit... you should see your ethanol content go lower.

    I would just do this until the content says "0" and then dial your maf table to be just a few % on the high side (-1 to -3 STFT/LTFT). This should keep your ECM from thinking you are running eth.
    Thanks for the info

  11. #91
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    Quote Originally Posted by SlowNStock View Post
    Disregard the timing strategy in that post, after doing more detailed logs, it's not correct - I haven't had a chance to follow up on it yet.
    I found a useful description of the ignition strategy by Toyota engineering personnel:

    https://patentswarm.com/patents/US7712450B2

    Most relevant excerpt on calculation of the ignition timing:

    Ignition-Patent.png

    Thought you might be interested.

  12. #92
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    Hi there - first post. I've read through the thread. I just installed a Magnuson S/C on my 2017 Tundra FFV a week ago. It wasn't until recently that I cared to know anything about the ethanol calculation the ECU does (due to the Tundra's lack of an actual ethanol sensor). Magnuson's instruction manual says that with the provided calibration, after the first start the ethanol density should decrement to 0%, but it doesn't and hangs around 14 to 25%. After refueling, I understand it takes the first few minutes of drive time to calculate the ethanol %. I've been in touch with Magnuson tech support, who has been amazing, and they assure me that up to 30% is okay and there is only a problem if the number starts ramping way up, as there is no way to simply turn the ethanol sensor off. Maybe this has been the way they've attempted to "tune out" the ethanol density - by lowering the MAF tables so that the ECU sees a richer mixture after refueling and zeroes the ethanol (??) I am curious of one thing.

    In closed-loop operation, the AFR(commanded and measured) is consistently reported as 14.7:1, no matter what the ethanol density is reported (14.9% to 25%). If I were running E85, the optimal AFR is 9.8:1. Would the ECU indeed report a commanded (and in following) a measured AFR of 9.8:1 (in theory)?? It seems like the ethanol density % is just a modifier to the base fuel injection maps, or no? Higher ethanol % will cause richer AFR, lower will cause leaner, but ultimately it relies on the AFR sensor to determine that after refueling?

    Any help in understanding this is appreciated. I have not taken a dive into VCM editor and have no plans to, but want to understand what's going on, what I should be seeing and the logic.

    Many thanks!

  13. #93
    Quote Originally Posted by AccordULEV View Post
    Hi there - first post. I've read through the thread. I just installed a Magnuson S/C on my 2017 Tundra FFV a week ago. It wasn't until recently that I cared to know anything about the ethanol calculation the ECU does (due to the Tundra's lack of an actual ethanol sensor). Magnuson's instruction manual says that with the provided calibration, after the first start the ethanol density should decrement to 0%, but it doesn't and hangs around 14 to 25%. After refueling, I understand it takes the first few minutes of drive time to calculate the ethanol %. I've been in touch with Magnuson tech support, who has been amazing, and they assure me that up to 30% is okay and there is only a problem if the number starts ramping way up, as there is no way to simply turn the ethanol sensor off. Maybe this has been the way they've attempted to "tune out" the ethanol density - by lowering the MAF tables so that the ECU sees a richer mixture after refueling and zeroes the ethanol (??) I am curious of one thing.

    In closed-loop operation, the AFR(commanded and measured) is consistently reported as 14.7:1, no matter what the ethanol density is reported (14.9% to 25%). If I were running E85, the optimal AFR is 9.8:1. Would the ECU indeed report a commanded (and in following) a measured AFR of 9.8:1 (in theory)?? It seems like the ethanol density % is just a modifier to the base fuel injection maps, or no? Higher ethanol % will cause richer AFR, lower will cause leaner, but ultimately it relies on the AFR sensor to determine that after refueling?

    Any help in understanding this is appreciated. I have not taken a dive into VCM editor and have no plans to, but want to understand what's going on, what I should be seeing and the logic.

    Many thanks!
    check out disabling ethanol sensing on 2012 tundra thread

  14. #94
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    Quote Originally Posted by AccordULEV View Post
    Hi there - first post. I've read through the thread. I just installed a Magnuson S/C on my 2017 Tundra FFV a week ago. It wasn't until recently that I cared to know anything about the ethanol calculation the ECU does (due to the Tundra's lack of an actual ethanol sensor). Magnuson's instruction manual says that with the provided calibration, after the first start the ethanol density should decrement to 0%, but it doesn't and hangs around 14 to 25%. After refueling, I understand it takes the first few minutes of drive time to calculate the ethanol %. I've been in touch with Magnuson tech support, who has been amazing, and they assure me that up to 30% is okay and there is only a problem if the number starts ramping way up, as there is no way to simply turn the ethanol sensor off. Maybe this has been the way they've attempted to "tune out" the ethanol density - by lowering the MAF tables so that the ECU sees a richer mixture after refueling and zeroes the ethanol (??) I am curious of one thing.

    In closed-loop operation, the AFR(commanded and measured) is consistently reported as 14.7:1, no matter what the ethanol density is reported (14.9% to 25%). If I were running E85, the optimal AFR is 9.8:1. Would the ECU indeed report a commanded (and in following) a measured AFR of 9.8:1 (in theory)?? It seems like the ethanol density % is just a modifier to the base fuel injection maps, or no? Higher ethanol % will cause richer AFR, lower will cause leaner, but ultimately it relies on the AFR sensor to determine that after refueling?

    Any help in understanding this is appreciated. I have not taken a dive into VCM editor and have no plans to, but want to understand what's going on, what I should be seeing and the logic.

    Many thanks!
    Yes, you are in the ballpark. (from best I can gather.. as I am also wandering somewhat aimlessly through the same, said, ballpark)

    So a few notes.. forgive the rambling.. but this is just a lot of what I learned recently about my own ecm and how FFV and alcohol content effects it.

    I have a 2016 FFV Supercharged so we have basically the same ecm/truck. Mine is self tuned with HPT, however.

    The 30% thing... yes, there are 2 "options" for most tables on the FFV. "30" and "75". That's in relation to ethanol. So less than 30 uses one and more than 75 uses the other.
    NOW... thats NOT to say that there are not situations where the ECM may calculate based on BOTH those, say if you are at 25%... (ecm could say meet in between the 2... 60% "30" table/40% "75" table).

    There may be black/white areas where it ONLY uses one or the other... but with such a complicated ecm I cant imagine they dont interpolate when in between.

    As far as fueling. I had noticed I was getting much better fuel top end when the ecm thought there was high ethanol. So yes, it's definitely opening injectors longer.. however there are tables that we cant see that are also effected when eth is high.
    So... what that means is we need to get ya close to "0".

    I had significant problems with my tune being fueled well and then suddenly a day later being more lean. Every time I flashed it, nice and rich.. until a day later.
    The ONE thing that was consistent is I was always showing high eth content. At first it was totally by accident.. I didnt realize it was so high. Later I raised it intentionally to see if it helped top end. (I was maxed on maf and PE tables)
    Long story short, it DID add fueling but it was not worth the unpredictability of the tune in high eth mode.

    So.. where this can help you... I can help move the eth content.

    Do you have the ability to scan and modify the tune now yourself?

    If you can post your tune and a scan here, or message me it, I should be able to get your content back to 0%.