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Thread: 2016 Camaro LGX

  1. #1
    Potential Tuner genec's Avatar
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    2016 Camaro LGX

    Just referred here. I'm old school builder from the 60's when I swapped a 394 ci Olds into a '40 Ford coupe.

    Then a long break until I swapped a 2006 Colorado I4 with a 4L65E into a 1981 CJ5. I started to pick up some OBDII experience, and ended up clearing the monitors so it could smog, but did not modify any controls and have no tuning experience.

    Now I have become interested and started on a 1950 Austin of England sedan that I want to be a cruiser, Semi Pro Street I suppose. I plan Heidt coil over front, XKE rear, and conversion to a two door. I probably went off half cocked when I picked up a low mileage rolled 2016 Camaro LT with the LGX V6 and 8L4500 for the doner vehicle. Evidently the changes that were made from the 2015 and earlier LFX V6's compounds the difficulty of even an ecu flash and stand alone wiring harness.

    My question here after lurking for a couple days is: Would the consensus be to cut my losses and look for an LFX, or continue with the build and anticipate that as the LGX engine ages out there may be a source for reflashed computers and wiring harnesses?

  2. #2
    What is better? The known? Or the unknown?

    The LFX has been around since 2012, and variants of it remain in production until this very day (the 2020 LFY is basically an LFX with start/stop). As such, the aftermarket has been developing both a knowledge base and parts since 2012, compared to 2016 for the LGX.

    There's also evidence the LGX will see far much less usage than the LFX considering the big switch to turbocharged 4 cylinders versus naturally aspirated V6s. When the 2016 / Gen6 Camaro launched, they had both a turbo 4 (LTG) and the LGX as alternatives to the V8. I would submit the LGX is more popular than the LTG in the Gen6 Camaro, but for every LTG Camaro they sold, that's one less LGX Camaro they sold.

    And, then, there's the issue of declining popularity of the Gen6 Camaro in general compared to the Gen5. The 2020 Camaro is the sole remaining RWD platform that uses the LGX, since they discontinued the Cadillac ATS, CTS (after 2019), and CT6 (after 2020). The 2021 - 2022 Colorado / Canyon should retain the LGZ (similar to the LGX) but even that platform is rumored to be switching to a turbo 4 in 2023 - which is also the rumored end of life for the Gen6 Camaro. Most overseas markets have all but abandoned naturally aspirated V6s.

    I seriously doubt the LGX will ever be nearly as plentiful or popular than the LFX. After saying all that, if your only objective is to make the LGX work in your project, it shouldn't be any more "difficult" than an LFX, but you will surely find fewer people that can help out if you do run into a snag.

    Good luck, sounds like a fun project!

  3. #3
    Potential Tuner genec's Avatar
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    Thanks Tunerpro. As I research this after the fact I'm trying to clarify the changes that were made in the LGX ecu. I have been led to believe the VAT protocols have increased the difficulty of reflashing. Is this just a function of the number of tuners interested in this particular engine, or is it similar to John Deere controlling the proprietary software in their tractors, precluding the farmer from working on his own equipment, or in this case GM?

  4. #4
    Around 2015, the 4 cylinder and 6 cylinder engines started receiving a newer, faster ECM, presumably so they could communicate with the 8 speed transmission controller (even the LFY now uses this new ECM family). There's nothing dramatically different about the calibration constructs running in them versus the LFX. I'm personally not aware of anything that makes them "more difficult" to flash aside from the fact the LGX controller in 2016 was the first production level ECM to use the more stringent security exchange. But, in 2017 ALL of them (including the LFX controller) switched to the same, more stringent security exchange.

    Being a newer controller there may be less parameter support in the editor for it. I personally haven't tried to run an LGX in a standalone so I am not sure what potential roadblocks there are. As you mentioned above, the wiring harness is definitely different, so if you're looking for a turn-key harness you can buy, you might not find one for the LGX.

  5. #5
    Potential Tuner genec's Avatar
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    Thanks again. I appreciate the information and may proceed with the build since dimension and weight will be the same for an LFX. I might even make it a manual transmission car. That's the new anti theft device.