Results 1 to 16 of 16

Thread: Tundra Tuning Reference

  1. #1

    Tundra Tuning Reference

    Been working on this off-and-on while; still not complete, but with more and more people tuning Tundras I wanted to share it now that it's in a workable form. There are quite a few updates and revisions already in the pipeline (lots more for spark, adding a transmission section, and a channel listing and example polling intervals in the VCM Scanner section). I'll also add some more of tools for calculating/scaling tables in the near future (the attached tools have updates coming, too), along with some actual instructions for using them.

    This is more a quick start for those with some experience tuning to get up to speed on some idiosyncrasies, not so much a manual for someone totally new to tuning.

    PM me any corrections and errata and I'll update accordingly - feedback and suggestions are always welcome. As always, caveat emptor.

    Tundra Tuning Reference: https://drive.google.com/file/d/1vjg...7USHoswg7/view
    Ignition Efficiency Inverse Tool: Tundra Ignition Efficiency (2).xlsx
    Tune Scaling Tool: Tundra Scaling.xlsx
    Trans Quick Reference Tool: AB60.xlsx

    1/26/2021 - Revisions and corrections to the following:

    Updated the ignition efficiency tool to make working between the Ignition Efficiency and Inverse tables easier. I've had a few requests for this as people work around torque management tables not being available in certain calibrations.
    The past copy of the TPS tool has been removed - a revised tool to build TPS curves based on power requests will be added for distribution once a guide can be written.
    Last edited by SlowNStock; 01-26-2021 at 09:29 PM. Reason: Updated Reference to V1.1

  2. #2
    Tuner in Training
    Join Date
    May 2019
    Posts
    47
    How to open those document?

  3. #3
    Tuner in Training
    Join Date
    Sep 2018
    Posts
    32
    Thanks a lot @SlownNstock ��

  4. #4
    Advanced Tuner WS6HUMMER's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Pineville La. US
    Posts
    769
    This is awesome, thank you for doing this!

  5. #5
    Advanced Tuner WS6HUMMER's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Pineville La. US
    Posts
    769
    If calibrating the speedometer in the software will solve the speed mismatch issue but not make the speedometer read accurately is there another way to actually correct the speedometer?
    The slides you made are so helpful, thanks again!
    99 T/A WS6, SBE original LS1, GT4788,TH400, TR224, stock heads.

  6. #6
    Quote Originally Posted by WS6HUMMER View Post
    If calibrating the speedometer in the software will solve the speed mismatch issue but not make the speedometer read accurately is there another way to actually correct the speedometer?
    The slides you made are so helpful, thanks again!
    Happy to share, it's better for everyone if information is easy to have. If you find anything confusing or needing clarification or just plain incorrect (other than the spark section, I'm actively working on a big revision for that), let me know and I'll get it updated.

    Correcting the speedometer requires an inline calibrators (Hypertech, Rough Country, YellowBox, etc.). Really, both need to be used to get everything back to normal, just using an inline calibrator causes other weird things like indicated cruise speed not matching the speed shown in the cluster (pretty common complaint).

  7. #7
    Advanced Tuner WS6HUMMER's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Pineville La. US
    Posts
    769
    Quote Originally Posted by SlowNStock View Post
    Happy to share, it's better for everyone if information is easy to have. If you find anything confusing or needing clarification or just plain incorrect (other than the spark section, I'm actively working on a big revision for that), let me know and I'll get it updated.

    Correcting the speedometer requires an inline calibrators (Hypertech, Rough Country, YellowBox, etc.). Really, both need to be used to get everything back to normal, just using an inline calibrator causes other weird things like indicated cruise speed not matching the speed shown in the cluster (pretty common complaint).
    Thank you for the explanation, & I definitely will.
    99 T/A WS6, SBE original LS1, GT4788,TH400, TR224, stock heads.

  8. #8
    Advanced Tuner TheMechanic's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    SoCal
    Posts
    433
    any way to get your tuning reference in word or pdf? Would like to be able to read ofline.
    Thank you

  9. #9
    Potential Tuner
    Join Date
    Jun 2020
    Posts
    9
    Quote Originally Posted by SlowNStock View Post
    Been working on this off-and-on while; still not complete, but with more and more people tuning Tundras I wanted to share it now that it's in a workable form. There are quite a few updates and revisions already in the pipeline (lots more for spark, adding a transmission section, and a channel listing and example polling intervals in the VCM Scanner section). I'll also add some more of tools for calculating/scaling tables in the near future (the attached tools have updates coming, too), along with some actual instructions for using them.
    Thank you!

  10. #10
    Updated the original post to V1.1 - fixed a few items, made some updates to try to improve readability, added quite a bit more on spark, added some transmission info, and added a list of common channels.

    Based on a number of requests, the link is now to a PDF copy of the file.

  11. #11
    Tuner in Training
    Join Date
    Nov 2020
    Posts
    19
    Quote Originally Posted by SlowNStock View Post
    Been working on this off-and-on while; still not complete, but with more and more people tuning Tundras I wanted to share it now that it's in a workable form. There are quite a few updates and revisions already in the pipeline (lots more for spark, adding a transmission section, and a channel listing and example polling intervals in the VCM Scanner section). I'll also add some more of tools for calculating/scaling tables in the near future (the attached tools have updates coming, too), along with some actual instructions for using them.

    This is more a quick start for those with some experience tuning to get up to speed on some idiosyncrasies, not so much a manual for someone totally new to tuning.

    PM me any corrections and errata and I'll update accordingly - feedback and suggestions are always welcome. As always, caveat emptor.

    Tundra Tuning Reference: https://drive.google.com/file/d/1vjg...7USHoswg7/view
    Ignition Efficiency Inverse Tool: Tundra Ignition Efficiency (2).xlsx
    Tune Scaling Tool: Tundra Scaling.xlsx
    Trans Quick Reference Tool: AB60.xlsx

    1/26/2021 - Revisions and corrections to the following:

    Updated the ignition efficiency tool to make working between the Ignition Efficiency and Inverse tables easier. I've had a few requests for this as people work around torque management tables not being available in certain calibrations.
    The past copy of the TPS tool has been removed - a revised tool to build TPS curves based on power requests will be added for distribution once a guide can be written.
    Hello Slownstock,

    Could you please explain how to tune transmission to shift faster.
    also how to tune torque reduction tables.


    thank you in advance.

  12. #12
    Potential Tuner
    Join Date
    Dec 2021
    Posts
    8
    Any 2019 tranny tables out yet? Procharger sold a prototype to my client with on ECM tables, needless to say the trans died 5 times already...

    Sigh, how can you do half a tune guys?

  13. #13
    Advanced Tuner
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Posts
    242
    Quote Originally Posted by walter1967 View Post
    Any 2019 tranny tables out yet? Procharger sold a prototype to my client with on ECM tables, needless to say the trans died 5 times already...

    Sigh, how can you do half a tune guys?
    Not all the calibration data is available in all Toyota through OBD2 port, the calibration resides across multiple chips, its a bugger.

  14. #14
    Advanced Tuner
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Posts
    242
    Well documented excellent write up.

  15. #15
    Quote Originally Posted by Mr.AT View Post
    Hello Slownstock,

    Could you please explain how to tune transmission to shift faster.
    also how to tune torque reduction tables.

    thank you in advance.
    That depends on what you mean by shift faster - WOT is largely fixed, but you can improve part-throttle upshifts quite a bit by working shift schedules to target 100% output shaft torque retention across the shift. The factory shift schedule logic is generally aimed around input shaft torque retention. Here's a simple tool that will calculate both figures for a given shift: Shift Scheduling Helper.xlsx

    If your calibration has the trans pressure tables defined, you can make some small changes; in my experience, shift harshness goes up more quickly than shift times come down with that approach, so I tend to leave them pretty stock. There are other ways, but I haven't done enough testing to share them yet.

    For torque reduction tables, it helps to convert and work with a percentage torque reduction, here's a tool for that: Torque Management Helper.xlsx

    Torque reduction for downshifts can be solved for fairly easily - by calculating the torque before/after the shift, we can determine a torque reduction value that will match the engine torque value after the shift. This works well for a downshift because we don't need to worry about decelerating anything on the input side to mitigate shift harshness; upshifts are trickier, though, because we want to match engine torque but also need torque management to help slow down everything forward of the input shaft to mitigate shift shock. We can calculate the upshift torque management with enough information (friction torque, rate of timing reduction, inertia), but it's far easier to just iterate from the stock upshift values - decrease the torque reduction by 10% in each iteration until you reach an acceptable level of harshness, then try smaller steps in each direction to fine tune from there.

    For all of the above, I'd suggest redefining table axes to get more usable ranges.

    Quote Originally Posted by 4wheelinls1 View Post
    Well documented excellent write up.
    Appreciate the feedback! Some of the information is out-of-date at this point; eventually, I'll post an update to the entire document with some examples.

  16. #16
    Advanced Tuner
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Posts
    242
    Quote Originally Posted by SlowNStock View Post
    That depends on what you mean by shift faster - WOT is largely fixed, but you can improve part-throttle upshifts quite a bit by working shift schedules to target 100% output shaft torque retention across the shift. The factory shift schedule logic is generally aimed around input shaft torque retention. Here's a simple tool that will calculate both figures for a given shift: Shift Scheduling Helper.xlsx

    If your calibration has the trans pressure tables defined, you can make some small changes; in my experience, shift harshness goes up more quickly than shift times come down with that approach, so I tend to leave them pretty stock. There are other ways, but I haven't done enough testing to share them yet.

    For torque reduction tables, it helps to convert and work with a percentage torque reduction, here's a tool for that: Torque Management Helper.xlsx

    Torque reduction for downshifts can be solved for fairly easily - by calculating the torque before/after the shift, we can determine a torque reduction value that will match the engine torque value after the shift. This works well for a downshift because we don't need to worry about decelerating anything on the input side to mitigate shift harshness; upshifts are trickier, though, because we want to match engine torque but also need torque management to help slow down everything forward of the input shaft to mitigate shift shock. We can calculate the upshift torque management with enough information (friction torque, rate of timing reduction, inertia), but it's far easier to just iterate from the stock upshift values - decrease the torque reduction by 10% in each iteration until you reach an acceptable level of harshness, then try smaller steps in each direction to fine tune from there.

    For all of the above, I'd suggest redefining table axes to get more usable ranges.



    Appreciate the feedback! Some of the information is out-of-date at this point; eventually, I'll post an update to the entire document with some examples.

    It might be worth adding in regards to Forced induction where the air box and MAF is stock I have seen lots of people try to adjust the fuel in the MAF curve and not the Load Multiplier where it should be. People raise the MAF in error causing the ECU to reach its maximum flow in error. Once the injector constant is set the fuel can be dialled in using the Load multiplier relative to boost, also when manifold referencing the regulator. The MAF is calibrated on the bench and is stock and best left, rectify the tune in the place the mechanical change was made.