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Thread: Newbie here, with a 2015 Chevy Trax 1.4L turbo

  1. #21
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    And I'm not trying to create fuel economy out of thin air either, I'm talking about a tune that would allow to take advantage of a higher octane value of a premium fuel, allowing to have higher cylinder pressure without detonation. The oem ECM mapping is for regular fuel (87 Octane), with a 91 Octane mapping, I could improve fuel economy in the long run, some like Trifecta and Diablosports already advertise this, if it's true or not I don't know, but the do advertise more power with better fuel economy.

    What bothers me with Trifecta and Diablosports is that they have a lot of negative reviews, with a lot of positives too, but in many of the negatives ones, HP Tuners is cited as being better, which got me interested.

    Then after posting the original post here, I saw that HP tuners removed custom "mods" from their repository, a couple of years back, when switching to 4.0 version I think.

    To make a long story short, I'm being indecisive because of the prohibitive cost of HP tuners, while lacking easy plug'n play tunes, like some other offers. I feel like I'm going to need to study a lot on engine inner workings to be able to tune mine, with the risk of blowing my daily driver...
    Last edited by Dr_Evil; 2 Weeks Ago at 09:19 AM.

  2. #22
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    Thank you very much guys,

    So, after discussing it with my wife, I think I'll buy one anyway...

    But, I'd like to know, is the Chevrolet Trax even supported? I can see the Buick Encore and the Chevrolet Cruze, both have the same engine, same ECM, but the Chevrolet Trax is not listed as being compatible.

    All I need is the MPVI3 and the 2 credits (If it's the same as the Buick encore), and the free software right? Nothing else?

    Anyone have a file I could look at to start training myself? Any online training that could help?

    Thank you

  3. #23
    If your vehicle is not in the supported vehicle list I would contact HPT support to ask if it the same. I don’t even remember what a Chevy trax is, but unless it’s a very rare vehicle, I would expect it to be in the list if it’s supported.

  4. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by gtstorey View Post
    If your vehicle is not in the supported vehicle list I would contact HPT support to ask if it the same. I don’t even remember what a Chevy trax is, but unless it’s a very rare vehicle, I would expect it to be in the list if it’s supported.
    Thanks I sent an email to support at hptuners.com to ask, but I'm guessing it is supported because I'm seeing a lot of people on different forums telling they got it for their Trax.

    This is a Chevy Trax

    Trax.jpg
    Trax_rear.jpg

    This is a Buick Encore (All parts except some body parts are interchangeable)

    Encore.JPG
    Encore_rear.JPG

    And they both have the same powertrain as the Chevy Cruze 1.4L Turbo Ecotec Engine

    Trax_Engine.jpg

  5. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by gtstorey View Post
    +1. If it was that simple to create a generic tune that did this, why wouldn't the OEM do it to start with. You might get a tune that offers better fuel mileage, but about the only way to do much is to reduce power. Basically it will force you to drive to improve mileage, which you can do anyway by being gentle on the throttle.
    Fuel economy is a fancy thing these days. Catalytic converter must not overheat or it might melt/die, so it simply dumps too much fuel under wide open throttle to cool it down.
    My car in stock form doesn't even use power enrichment, it relies on "temperature protection" to add additional fuel for on-boost power, and this temperature protection doesn't even know the actual temperature of the catalytic converter, but uses some fancy formula to estimate it. There's really no point to dump that much fuel to cool the cat when all i did was a 2nd and 3rd gear pull and then continue to drive normally.

    This is a very broadly used engine, and every car model is different, and every cooling system for a different model car is different (and the airflow around the exhaust components) - BUT the base tune is the same across all of them.

    As for the AFR number, adding more fuel displaces oxygen therefore you actually lose power. Very small, but measurable. Removing fuel actually increases power AND reduces fuel consumption at the cost of some components maybe running hotter. You can get more out of a generic customer car like this, than a straight up sports car that's tuned from the factory to the limits.
    Driving on the highway under no-load and fixed speed can be improved by running even leaner and advancing spark timing, it results in lower fuel consumption and same power output at the expense of different exhaust gas composition (google honda lean-burn system).

    This is only a rough outline, but there's so many places where you can save on fuel in the map files.


    There's also the point of CO2 and NOx emissions, more fuel -> more volume of gasses -> SAME ACTUAL amount of NOx in the exhaust stream -> "less percent" of bad gasses per mass of exhaust.
    And that's how you get numbers that look nice on paper to show to your local government/european union and make the impression that you're eco friendly.




    Quote Originally Posted by Dr_Evil View Post
    Thanks I sent an email to support at hptuners.com to ask, but I'm guessing it is supported because I'm seeing a lot of people on different forums telling they got it for their Trax.

    This is a Chevy Trax

    Trax.jpg
    Trax_rear.jpg

    This is a Buick Encore (All parts except some body parts are interchangeable)

    Encore.JPG
    Encore_rear.JPG

    And they both have the same powertrain as the Chevy Cruze 1.4L Turbo Ecotec Engine

    Trax_Engine.jpg
    My car also isn't listed on their main page, but it's the E78 ECU and same engine and it works just fine.

    You can post any questions regarding your tune on the forums, and we'll try to help when we have time.
    Last edited by sbarisic; 2 Weeks Ago at 08:57 AM.

  6. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by sbarisic View Post
    Fuel economy is a fancy thing these days. Catalytic converter must not overheat or it might melt/die, so it simply dumps too much fuel under wide open throttle to cool it down.
    My car in stock form doesn't even use power enrichment, it relies on "temperature protection" to add additional fuel for on-boost power, and this temperature protection doesn't even know the actual temperature of the catalytic converter, but uses some fancy formula to estimate it. There's really no point to dump that much fuel to cool the cat when all i did was a 2nd and 3rd gear pull and then continue to drive normally.

    This is a very broadly used engine, and every car model is different, and every cooling system for a different model car is different (and the airflow around the exhaust components) - BUT the base tune is the same across all of them.

    As for the AFR number, adding more fuel displaces oxygen therefore you actually lose power. Very small, but measurable. Removing fuel actually increases power AND reduces fuel consumption at the cost of some components maybe running hotter. You can get more out of a generic customer car like this, than a straight up sports car that's tuned from the factory to the limits.
    Driving on the highway under no-load and fixed speed can be improved by running even leaner and advancing spark timing, it results in lower fuel consumption and same power output at the expense of different exhaust gas composition (google honda lean-burn system).

    This is only a rough outline, but there's so many places where you can save on fuel in the map files.


    There's also the point of CO2 and NOx emissions, more fuel -> more volume of gasses -> SAME ACTUAL amount of NOx in the exhaust stream -> "less percent" of bad gasses per mass of exhaust.
    And that's how you get numbers that look nice on paper to show to your local government/european union and make the impression that you're eco friendly.






    My car also isn't listed on their main page, but it's the E78 ECU and same engine and it works just fine.

    You can post any questions regarding your tune on the forums, and we'll try to help when we have time.
    Thank you very much, very informative, I'll post questions for sure

    And it's also a E78 ECU on my Trax
    Last edited by Dr_Evil; 1 Weeks Ago at 07:38 PM.

  7. #27
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    Sorry to be a downer, here's my .02 from reading this thread: you're going to be happier and better off purchasing a tune from a professional shop.

    You'll need to dedicate many hours reading/researching/adjusting/dynoing your vehicle, otherwise you're going to be frustrated and disappointed in the results. Read this article from HPTuners support to understand how the E78 works: http://www.hptuners.com/help/VCM-Edi...th_e78_ecm.htm

    There are a handful of tuners already mentioned here, both good/bad to use. No need for me to chime in and say which shop is better, I'd recommend you research (sounds like you already have) and call the few you're interested in. Most people are happy to chat on the phone about what they can/can't do with a tune for you specifically. Most of them use a HPTuners RTD through their shop to deliver their tunes to you.

    Haven't seen anyone else mention it here yet, but you will also need a Wideband O2 installed and connected to HPTuners MPVI so you can see what your actual AFR is. Without one, you're shooting in the dark when making fueling changes. GM doesn't use Widebands on most vehicles, as an owner and tuner of my 13 Sonic, I can confirm the E78 doesn't (so Trax/Encore don't have one either).

    HPTuners supports the E78 in the Sonic/Encore/Trax, worst case your OS isn't mapped which would be a quick update from the support team but I'm going to bet it's already supported now.
    ~Erik~
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  8. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by ScarabEpic22 View Post
    Sorry to be a downer, here's my .02 from reading this thread: you're going to be happier and better off purchasing a tune from a professional shop.

    You'll need to dedicate many hours reading/researching/adjusting/dynoing your vehicle, otherwise you're going to be frustrated and disappointed in the results. Read this article from HPTuners support to understand how the E78 works: http://www.hptuners.com/help/VCM-Edi...th_e78_ecm.htm

    There are a handful of tuners already mentioned here, both good/bad to use. No need for me to chime in and say which shop is better, I'd recommend you research (sounds like you already have) and call the few you're interested in. Most people are happy to chat on the phone about what they can/can't do with a tune for you specifically. Most of them use a HPTuners RTD through their shop to deliver their tunes to you.

    Haven't seen anyone else mention it here yet, but you will also need a Wideband O2 installed and connected to HPTuners MPVI so you can see what your actual AFR is. Without one, you're shooting in the dark when making fueling changes. GM doesn't use Widebands on most vehicles, as an owner and tuner of my 13 Sonic, I can confirm the E78 doesn't (so Trax/Encore don't have one either).

    HPTuners supports the E78 in the Sonic/Encore/Trax, worst case your OS isn't mapped which would be a quick update from the support team but I'm going to bet it's already supported now.
    Hi, dang, I just pull the trigger on the MVPI3 and the credits, oh well, guess I'll have to learn now...

    Thank you

  9. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by ScarabEpic22 View Post
    Haven't seen anyone else mention it here yet, but you will also need a Wideband O2 installed and connected to HPTuners MPVI so you can see what your actual AFR is. Without one, you're shooting in the dark when making fueling changes. GM doesn't use Widebands on most vehicles, as an owner and tuner of my 13 Sonic, I can confirm the E78 doesn't (so Trax/Encore don't have one either).
    Any wideband O2 sensor to recommend? Anything plug and play that doesn't need rewiring?

    Thank you.

  10. #30
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    Just a heads up we were able to confirm support for the 2015 Trax 1.4 application today and added it to our supported vehicle list. We likely support other years of the trax but need to confirm before adding them to the supported vehicle page.
    It doesn't have to be perfect, it just needs to be done in two weeks...

    A wise man once said "google it"

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  12. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bill@HPTuners View Post
    Just a heads up we were able to confirm support for the 2015 Trax 1.4 application today and added it to our supported vehicle list. We likely support other years of the trax but need to confirm before adding them to the supported vehicle page.
    Yes, thank you very much Bill, excellent service, have a nice weekend!

    (Yup, that was me on the other end of those emails )

  13. #33
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    Oh, I see! I though I had to replace the O2 sensor that is pluggued into my car harness with a Wideband sensor instead.

    I'm not equipped to drill and weld a second bung to add another sensor to my catalytic converter though.

    And there is very little room to be able to add one too...

    The Catalytic converter is right after the turbo.

    Turbo.JPG

    There is no room at all to add a second O2 Sensor...

    Cat.JPG

    Would it be possible to install a wideband O2 sensor instead of the original sensor, and have the ECU running properly with it?

    Thank you for the info.
    Last edited by Dr_Evil; 1 Week Ago at 10:26 AM.

  14. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dr_Evil View Post
    Would it be possible to install a wideband O2 sensor instead of the original sensor, and have the ECU running properly with it?
    I guess this answer that : https://www.google.com/search?q=repl...ptQPtJq1sA4_37

  15. #35
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    So this : https://www.14point7.com/products/sp...a-controller-2

    Wired in the original ECU O2 sensor plug (Signal ground to black and narrowband output (brown) to signal wire), with a Bosch LSU 4.9 instead of my original sensor. (Might have to disable heater failure detection in the ECU though, if possible)

    Bring up a 12V and a gnd from the fusebox to power it up, and the heater, and use the output 0-5V to a gauge : https://www.14point7.com/products/solid-afr-gauge and/or to the MVPI3 with the pro features and the prolink+ https://www.hptuners.com/product/pro-link-plus/ would do the trick...

    But... I think you may overestimate a bit how much fiddling I'll do in there

    And especially overestimating my budget...

  16. #36
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    I've tried replacing a narrowband with a wideband and wiring it up, never got it to work properly without the ECM throwing additional O2 codes. Probably not a worthwhile exercise to try it, but your call!

    Yep, it's tight with the factory cat on the LUV engines being immediately post-turbo BUT it's doable. My friend with a 2012 Sonic had a bung (comes with most WBO2s) welded in near the factory pre-cat sensor and it worked pretty well, have to ask the shop doing it to be creative and make sure there's room for the sensor to stick out. IIRC it was near this spot, marked it with a red arrow:

    trax wideband.jpg

    The AEM one recommended earlier is very convenient and what I'd recommend as well, plugs into your OBDII port and the MPVI plugs into it so you can read the WB datastream right in VCM Scanner.
    ~Erik~
    2013 Sonic RS - manual, CGM, 6M, sunroof, mods in process
    2008 TrailBlazer 3SS AWD LS2, loaded, dropped, modded, SE22 Performance tuned. And then some...
    2002 TrailBlazer LT 4WD 4.2L I6, lifted, tires, exhaust, SE22 Performance tuned

  17. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by ScarabEpic22 View Post
    I've tried replacing a narrowband with a wideband and wiring it up, never got it to work properly without the ECM throwing additional O2 codes. Probably not a worthwhile exercise to try it, but your call!
    The default O2 sensor has some heater circuitry, you only need to connect the actual output wire and then disable the codes for the heater in the tune. The computer will automatically switch to closed loop lambda feedback after the signal voltage drops below 1.1V.

    I have both the narrow and wideband welded into the exhaust basically next to each other. I'll post pics later.

    But this is a good idea and definitely something i'll look into in the future, to replace the narrowband with wideband.
    Last edited by sbarisic; 1 Week Ago at 12:31 PM.

  18. #38
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    Quote Originally Posted by sbarisic View Post
    The default O2 sensor has some heater circuitry, you only need to connect the actual output wire and then disable the codes for the heater in the tune. The computer will automatically switch to closed loop lambda feedback after the signal voltage drops below 1.1V.

    I have both the narrow and wideband welded into the exhaust basically next to each other. I'll post pics later.

    But this is a good idea and definitely something i'll look into in the future, to replace the narrowband with wideband.
    So even better : https://www.14point7.com/products/co...ntroller-3-adv

    Can be used to push the narrowband data to the ECU, I'd use the 4 wires coming from the original harness for the data and heater, to feed this module (heater + o2) only need to bring 12V to feed the electronics, and come with a usb converter that is compatible with VCM Scanner and Torque Pro on my phone!

    I'd be able to not only monitor the AFR using my phone, or my pc while tuning, log it with VCM scanner,, or keep an eye on it while driving, since I already use torque pro on a daily basis, without having to modify the harness itself, only recover the plug from the current O2 Sensor. Since the power to feed the O2 Heater would come from the same wires as they are now, I won't even have to, at least in theory, remove the heater from the ECU.

    Something like this
    O2 Wiring.png