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Thread: Automotive computer software

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    Automotive computer software

    Hello does anyone what programming language is used in automotive computers gm ford and dodge this is probably a funny queation but i would like to learn how automotive computers work

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    Advanced Tuner TheMechanic's Avatar
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    Bosch published several versions of the CAN specification and the latest is CAN 2.0 published in 1991. This specification has two parts; part A is for the standard format with an 11-bit identifier, and part B is for the extended format with a 29-bit identifier. A CAN device that uses 11-bit identifiers is commonly called CAN 2.0A and a CAN device that uses 29-bit identifiers is commonly called CAN 2.0B. These standards are freely available from Bosch along with other specifications and white papers.[4]

    https://elinux.org/CAN_Bus

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    Anybody have a source for free plans for how to build a moon rocket? I already have all the tools I think I'd need (mini-lathe, couple different kinds of welders, hacksaw, etc.).

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    Quote Originally Posted by JOHAN WALL View Post
    Hello does anyone what programming language is used in automotive computers gm ford and dodge this is probably a funny queation but i would like to learn how automotive computers work
    It depends on which kind of microcontroller was used on the particular ECU, most can be programmed in their particular assembly language or C if you want high level.
    Big game automotive manufacturers like GM do not use any particular programming language. There are tool suites (ladder diagrams and similar) similar to MATLAB which model the workings of the ECU and can be simulated, the end result is then "compiled" from the ECU model to a language like C, and then actually compiled to binary and put on the flash memory.

    There's actually some standards for how things like this can be developed. Reason being ECU-s are used in safety critical environments, therefore all the OS code has to be real time and so on..

    https://www.autosar.org/

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/AUTOSAR

    EDIT:

    More on the OS architecture

    http://trampolinebin.rts-software.org/os223.pdf

    http://trampolinebin.rts-software.org/oil25.pdf
    Last edited by sbarisic; 1 Week Ago at 11:16 PM.

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    Quote Originally Posted by sbarisic View Post
    It depends on which kind of microcontroller was used on the particular ECU, most can be programmed in their particular assembly language or C if you want high level.
    Big game automotive manufacturers like GM do not use any particular programming language. There are tool suites (ladder diagrams and similar) similar to MATLAB which model the workings of the ECU and can be simulated, the end result is then "compiled" from the ECU model to a language like C, and then actually compiled to binary and put on the flash memory.

    There's actually some standards for how things like this can be developed. Reason being ECU-s are used in safety critical environments, therefore all the OS code has to be real time and so on..

    https://www.autosar.org/

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/AUTOSAR

    EDIT:

    More on the OS architecture

    http://trampolinebin.rts-software.org/os223.pdf

    http://trampolinebin.rts-software.org/oil25.pdf
    Thank you for your reply i am learning c